My Clients Aren’t Bullied by Their Size

Why My Clients Aren't Bullied by Their Size Blog CarrieMontgomery.com

Walk into three different department stores and chances are, you’ll “be” three different sizes.

What a mental trip. Seeing the number 8, then 6, then 10 on the tag can be devastating for many women, because we subconsciously believe that our value and worth depends on our size.

Often, we’ll flee the store feeling like we’re less than, because nothing fits the way we expect it to. It puts us in a crappy mood.

Of course, it’s impossible for you to be three different sizes, so what size are you??

Enter: The Kinda-Sorta Fit - a flaw of modern day fashion… AKA FAST FASHION.

Sadly, this kind of experience happens all the time with my clients. One woman was so frustrated, because she thought she knew her size. Yet, in the dressing room, she had to try on piles of clothes in various sizes. Leaving her feeling confused.

Remember: the self-esteem you’re cultivating by creating a signature style has NOTHING to do with the number on the tag. Sure, it’s important to know your size, but be okay with the fact that you might be an 8 in one store, a 6 in another, and a 4 somewhere else (we call it, the range). Sizing doesn’t just mean the number on the tag – it depends on how the manufacturer cuts clothing.

Your size does not equal your worth.

Please don’t feel bad about your body when you try on clothes, because the difference in size is not a reflection of your value. It’s just a system to measure cloth.

Have you seen the show, This is Us? Kate wants to fit into a size seven. The way the scene is shot leads us think that it won’t fit, because she’s so accustomed to feeling bad about her body. Her character doesn’t know how to feel good about her shape. So, she couldn’t wear the dress that actually fit her at a size seven and instead reinforced the negative body image and tried on a size five.

Guess what? Clothes aren’t made to fit you.

We kind of get lost in that idea that I’m a size 8 and all size 8 pants and dresses should fit, right? When they don’t fit, it’s so easy to get stuck in a loop of negative self-talk. Standing in your underwear with those awful bright lights in the dressing room.

But, here’s the problem with mass-produced fashion:

The clothes aren’t made to fit your body perfectly; they’re made to kinda-sorta fit everyone.

I know. It sounds too simple to be true. Just think about it.

There’s no template for all clothing manufacturers to use anymore. The sizing system was created to mass-produce clothing, so they can sell the most pieces. Since there’s only one of you, there’s no way a garment right off the rack is going to fit perfectly.

Before the Industrial Revolution, most people didn’t have a ton of clothes. The pieces they had were created specifically for them, which means they rocked each look because they were tailor made!

I can’t tell you how often women ask me for style advice (like everywhere I go).  I get it, you want to look good and feel good, but you can’t find a pair of jeans that doesn’t give you muffin top and still fit your hips and legs.  We call this an apple shape, because the midsection is much smaller than the hips.

I always say “go up in size… fit the widest part of you and let your tailor take in the rest.”

Finding a tailor you love and trust is key to looking your best. So, is learning how to shop for your shape. Both steps are crucial to making sure that what you’re buying is going to flatter your body.

This is your chance to relish in the fact that there’s no one like you! When you alter clothing to fit your shape, you’re owning and claiming the piece as yours, right? Since we all know that once you’ve decided on your style; you’ve taken the first step to authenticating your true self, this is something that just has to happen. It’s a key part of the process.

And wow. If that’s not empowering, I don’t know what is!

Women are getting A LOT of out of my  Top Ten Style Revolution Tips.

Have you read them yet?

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The next time you go shopping, you’ll hear my voice in your head to help avoid this loop of negativity.